Two IDM students smiling and waving
IDM is unique. It's among a very few integrated design master's programs so it's in a small set to start with. But the reason we get the reaction from prospective students that we do is for the kind of gestalt and culture around and within the program.

You’ve seen this little simple model of DFV: Desirability—Feasibility—Viability. That’s not new, I’ve been teaching that for decades—design, engineering, and business.  It’s the formula for success in business in general. But what IDM founder Matt Kressy did was put a heart at the center of it. And what that says is, “You know what, there are a whole bunch of successful designs that are desirable, feasible, viable, but not particularly responsible, not particularly good for the world, not good for people, not good for the planet, not good for society, sustainability.” What’s missing is what I refer to as responsibility, some people call it sustainability. Matt calls it love. And basically, what it says is, “Yeah, we can have a whole bunch of success and destroy the planet, and we’ll have profits all along the way.”

“This heart symbolizes what makes us different, that’s there’s a more responsible way to do integrated design, and we have students who are passionate about it and we have instructors who care about it.”